Rescued Bats Just Hanging Around

(Just hanging around, getting ready for a release.)

(Just hanging around, getting ready for a release.)

Pictured are two of the five bats recently rescued by Connecticut Wildlife Rehabber Wanda D’Agostino. The three males and two females came from four different locations, including Hartford, Wethersfield, Bloomfield, and Coventry, Connecticut. They are all doing well, and Wanda plans a BIG release in April or May of 2015… “depending on when the bugs come out again.”

Coopers Hawk Fluffed Up & Ready to Go

(All puffed up to take on the winter cold.)

(All puffed up to take on the winter cold.)

This coopers hawk had a head injury (maybe hit by a car). He did well and was released after a few weeks of “R & R” and lots of mice. The person holding the hawk is Connecticut Wildlife Rehabber Wanda D’Agostino of East Hartford.

(Another hawk brought back to health by H.O.W.L. CT)

(Another hawk brought back to health by H.O.W.L. CT)

Know Your Rehabilitators: Brenda V. Cataldo

Brenda Cataldo has been a state licensed wildlife rehabilitator of the past 10 years, working out of her home in Bolton. She specializes in rehabbing squirrels, rabbits and turtles.

When asked why she became a rehabilitator, Brenda said, “I always wanted to be a veterinarian and this is the next best thing.” She cares for 30 to 40 animals each year, most injured by being attacked by dogs or cats or being hit by cards. After caring for their injuries, Brenda said most animals are able to be released. She especially enjoys raising orphaned bunnies and has good luck with these difficult “babies” who usually die in captivity.

Brenda V. Cataldo

Brenda has been married to her husband Frank for 32 years and has two children and one step-grandchild. She also shares her home with two dogs, two domestic rabbits, one Malaysian turtle (a rescue) and a conure parrot.

She has helped rehab 424 animals in the past 10 years with a 70% release ratio.

Brenda is also a professional photographer and uses funds earned by her photography to defray the cost of rehabilitating animals in her care.

rehabbing squirrels